ClickHole

Can You Match The Renowned Scientist To The Slime They Made?

Got the skills to match the world’s greatest minds to the viscous slimes that have defined their careers? Take this quiz to find out!

  1. 1. Alan Turing, OBE, FRS
    Alan Turing was a pioneering logician and cryptanalyst during WWII, and he’s considered the father of modern computer science. Which slime did he invent?

    Wrong! Alan Turing was the brilliant mind behind flat slime, the first slime that humans could safely interact with. Unfortunately, his lab was shut down after officials found out that his team had been unethically testing the slime on chimpanzees for decades and had killed dozens.

    Wrong! Alan Turing was the brilliant mind behind flat slime, the first slime that humans could safely interact with. Unfortunately, his lab was shut down after officials found out that his team had been unethically testing the slime on chimpanzees for decades and had killed dozens.

    Wrong! Alan Turing was the brilliant mind behind flat slime, the first slime that humans could safely interact with. Unfortunately, his lab was shut down after officials found out that his team had been unethically testing the slime on chimpanzees for decades and had killed dozens.

    Correct! Alan Turing was the brilliant mind behind flat slime, the first slime that humans could safely interact with. Unfortunately, his lab was shut down after officials found out that his team had been unethically testing the slime on chimpanzees for decades and had killed dozens.

  2. 2. Galileo Galilei
    Galileo was fascinated by the color green from an early age and yearned to invent something in its likeness. Which of these is Galileo’s slime?

    Wrong! Galileo actually invented oozing slime in 1635. He was the first Italian to invent slime and the first scientist to combine yellow and blue to make green, as well as the last person to die from eating the slime he created, in 1642.

    Correct! This was the first slime invented by an Italian. Galileo was also the first scientist to combine yellow and blue to make green, as well as the last person to die from eating the slime he created, in 1642.

    Wrong! Galileo actually invented oozing slime in 1635. He was the first Italian to invent slime and the first scientist to combine yellow and blue to make green, as well as the last person to die from eating the slime he created, in 1642.

    Wrong! Galileo actually invented oozing slime in 1635. He was the first Italian to invent slime and the first scientist to combine yellow and blue to make green, as well as the last person to die from eating the slime he created, in 1642.

  3. 3. Jane Goodall, DBE
    Jane Goodall invented a slime that accidentally oozed onto her body and almost killed her while she was in Tanzania. Which slime was it?

    Actually, you were very close. Jane Goodall discovered the slime known colloquially as “muck” in the field, but did not invent it. She in fact invented slop slime, and eventually sold it to a genetics company for an undisclosed amount of money.

    Correct! Jane Goodall has spent the majority of her life in the field investigating the mechanisms behind the slime known colloquially as “slop.” After surviving the slime accident, Goodall eventually sold her slime to a genetics company for an undisclosed amount of money.

    Actually, you were very close. Jane Goodall discovered the slime known colloquially as “sludge” in the field, but did not invent it. She in fact invented slop slime, and eventually sold it to a genetics company for an undisclosed amount of money.

    Actually, you were very close. Jane Goodall discovered the slime known colloquially as “gloop” in the field, but did not invent it. She in fact invented slop slime, and eventually sold it to a genetics company for an undisclosed amount of money.

  4. 4. The Manhattan Project
    Via atomicarchive.com
    The nearly 130,000 people recruited by the U.S. government to work together in the Los Alamos National Laboratory ultimately created:

    Correct! The scientists of the Manhattan Project invented auto slime, the first slime designed specifically to be shot into space. The large, multifaceted team spent $2 billion ($23 billion today) to put the slime aboard a space shuttle and shoot it into orbit. Unfortunately, while in the atmosphere, the slime exploded, killing everyone aboard.

    Sorry, that’s incorrect. Canned slime was actually created as a byproduct of IBM’s Watson. The Manhattan Project invented auto slime, and spent $2 billion ($23 billion today) to shoot it into space.

    Sorry, that’s incorrect. Ear slime was actually created by Marie Curie. The Manhattan Project invented auto slime, and spent $2 billion ($23 billion today) to shoot it into space.

    Sorry, that’s incorrect. Street slime was actually created by Nikola Tesla in 1891. The Manhattan Project invented auto slime, and spent $2 billion ($23 billion today) to shoot it into space.

  5. 5. Carl Sagan
    Via PBS
    Carl Sagan used the last episode of Cosmos, on December 21, 1980, to announce that he had invented which slime?

    Correct! Sagan, mostly known for popularizing slime, invented lime slime in 1979. Sagan famously introduced lime slime during his final Cosmos episode, “Episode 13: The Mythos Of Slime,” and stretched and twisted it into various shapes. The show then ended dramatically with Sagan throwing his slime against a wall and watching it stick.

    Wrong! Sagan invented lime slime. Sagan famously introduced lime slime during his final Cosmos episode, “Episode 13: The Mythos Of Slime,” and stretched and twisted it into various shapes. The show then ended dramatically with Sagan throwing his slime against a wall and watching it stick.

    Wrong! Sagan invented lime slime. Sagan famously introduced lime slime during his final Cosmos episode, “Episode 13: The Mythos Of Slime,” and stretched and twisted it into various shapes. The show then ended dramatically with Sagan throwing his slime against a wall and watching it stick.

    Wrong! Sagan invented lime slime. Sagan famously introduced lime slime during his final Cosmos episode, “Episode 13: The Mythos Of Slime,” and stretched and twisted it into various shapes. The show then ended dramatically with Sagan throwing his slime against a wall and watching it stick.

  • Results for Can You Match The Renowned Scientist To The Slime They Made?

    You’re A Slime Expert!

    Wow! Someone paid attention in science class—especially the slime unit! Given all the slimes out there, it’s no easy task remembering the scientist who slaved over each of them in the lab. Stephen Hawking, the slime master himself, would be proud!
  • Results for Can You Match The Renowned Scientist To The Slime They Made?

    You’ve Got A Decent Background In Slime

    Not bad. You know about an average amount about slime. If you took a quiz about slime, it would tell you that you’re pretty good!
  • Results for Can You Match The Renowned Scientist To The Slime They Made?

    You Know Nothing About Slime!

    Well, when it comes to your slime IQ, you seem to be seriously lacking. Marie Curie, Stephen Hawking, CERN—do you even care how many slimes they invented? Hit the books and try again—maybe next time you’ll get it right.

I am 18 or over and willing to view sexually explicit material